X

Caribbean Financial NetworkBahamas Banks

CIBC Bahamas

first-caribbean
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau
CIBC FirstCaribbean's knowledge of banking has been gained through a combined experience of almost 250 years in the Caribbean through our heritage organisations, Barclays PLC and CIBC. Both have the distinction of being the oldest banks in the Caribbean. They were a part of the development of the region since the days of salt cod and rum. Many changes have been made since then. Tourism is the new export, and West Indian businesses are now taking on the world. FirstCaribbean will be there to make that goal possible. FirstCaribbean was formed in 2002 with the merger of CIBC West Indies Holdings and Barclays Bank PLC Caribbean operations. In December 2006, CIBC acquired Barclays stake and became the majority shareholder in FirstCaribbean. On June 20, 2011 we proudly announced that we will be co-branded under the CIBC banner, adopting the branding CIBC FirstCaribbean. The addition of CIBC to the FirstCaribbean brand emphasizes CIBC’s long-term commitment to the Caribbean region, our employees and our clients. Our clients and our employees across the Caribbean will continue to benefit from the long-term investment that CIBC is making in the Caribbean – a history that dates back to our first branches opened in 1920. CIBC FirstCaribbean will continue to operate as a Caribbean-managed business within the CIBC group of companies, and trades as FirstCaribbean International Bank Limited on the stock exchanges of Barbados and Trinidad.

Central Bank of the Bahamas

bahamas-central-bank
Biz Phone
242-302-2620
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau, N.P
The Central Bank of The Bahamas was established on 1st June 1974, to carry out the independent monetary policy and financial sector supervisory functions entrusted upon The Bahamas after political independence from Great Britain in 1973. Prior to the establishment of the Bank, there was the Currency Board set up in 1919 which was restricted mainly to issuing currency. The Currency Board era spanned the early evolution of The Bahamas' emergence as an international banking centre during the 1960s, and the corresponding challenges posed by the inadequacies of legislation to properly regulate and supervise these activities. Although some relief was provided by the Banks and Trust Companies Regulation Act (1965), which enjoined stringent licensing and operating requirements on banks, it was felt that a more substantive institutional authority was required to oversee the rapidly expanding banking sector. This need for an alternative institutional arrangement with statutory powers became even more apparent amid the turbulent developments in global financial markets, marked by the 1967 devaluation of the Pound Sterling, to which the local currency was linked. Based on the emerging strong trade linkages with the United States, the Government de-linked the Bahamian dollar (formerly the pound) from its peg with the Pound Sterling, and established the currency on par with the United States' dollar. This action, however, resulted in massive exchange rate losses for banks which, in the absence of alternative domestic investment opportunities, held most of their assets in sterling balances. These events led to the demise of the Currency Board, which gave way to the establishment of the Bahamas Monetary Authority (BMA) in 1968. The Authority assumed the aggregate foreign exchange risks of the country by redeeming domestic banks' surplus foreign currency balances for Bahamian dollars, instituted a voluntary system of reserve requirements for clearing banks, and began auctioning Government Treasury bills as an alternative domestic investment for financial institutions. Despite having an expanded role, including supervisory authority, a serious shortcoming of the BMA was the absence of the legal authority to employ active monetary policy measures. This fundamental weakness came into sharp focus during the late 1960s, when the Authority was unable to exercise control over domestic credit expansion in order to correct the worsening balance of payments position. A decade later in the 1970s, the deficiency was further heightened, when the global economy battled the worldwide recession, brought on by the OPEC oil crisis. These and other developments led to the eventual establishment of a Bahamian central bank.

CBH Bahamas

cbh
Biz Phone
242 394 61 61
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau, N.P
CBH Bahamas Ltd is a wholly owned subsidiary of Compagnie Bancaire Helvetique SA dedicated to providing comprehensive wealth management services to high net worth individuals. Founded in 1995, CBH Bahamas Ltd is fully licensed and regulated by both the Securities Commission of the Bahamas and the Central Bank of the Bahamas, ensuring that we meet all regulatory requirements and adhere to the strictest standards in the industry. Our team of highly-skilled, competent, multi-lingual professionals seeks to provide superior service to a diversified range of private clients located throughout the globe.

Capital Union Bank

capital-union
Biz Phone
242-362-6880
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau
The Commonwealth of The Bahamas is an archipelago consisting of roughly 700 islands scattered over an area of 100’000 square miles. The capital city is Nassau, situated on the island of New Providence. The Bahamas has been independent since 1973 and is a member of the United Nations. The Bahamas is a stable, developing nation with an economy heavily dependent on tourism and private banking. Steady growth in tourism receipts and a boom in construction of new hotels, resorts, and residences has led to solid GDP growth for many years. Financial services constitute the second most important sector of the Bahamian economy, accounting for about 15% of GDP. The Bahamas has been involved in providing banking & trust services to the international financial community since the 1930s. The combination of a common law legal environment and an efficient tax system makes the Bahamas a well-suited domicile for trusts, foundations, and life insurance policies. The current asset base of the banking industry in the Bahamas is close to $450 billion, reflecting the unique success of this jurisdiction over the past 25 years.

Bahamas Development Bank

bahamas-development-bank
Biz Phone
242-702-5700
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau
Bahamian Independence Bahamas Development Bank established by an Act of Parliament Bahamas Development Bank opens its doors - The Bank became operational on July 21, 1978 with a staff of 5 in its first office located in Rawson Square on Bay Street, across from the historic House of Parliament. The Bank started with a government equity infusion of $2 million. There was so much demand in its early days of operation that the Bank had to secure additional funding from other sources like the Caribbean Development Bank ($6million), the Inter-American Bank ($3 million), the European Economic Community (EEC) ($1 million), the Central Bank of The Bahamas ($2.5 million) and the National Insurance Board ($3.5 million). Government equity in the Bank also gradually increased during its more than 35 years of operation. The Freeport Office is established- Recognizing a need to provide development financing in the second city – Freeport, Grand Bahama, management opened a branch in Freeport on July 15, 1986. The Branch is presently located in the Jasmine Corporate Centre in Freeport, Grand Bahama. The branch Officers not only prepare loan applications, but are actively engaged in following up on the large number of delinquent customers The Abaco Office is established - It became apparent to management that an additional office was needed in another northern island. On July 17, 1999, the Bank once again expanded its operation. This time a new branch was opened in Marsh Harbour Abaco. The office was located on Queen Elizabeth Drive and there were two persons employed on the staff at the time. Today, the branch operations in Abaco has been transferred to the Freeport Office of which both together constitute the Northern Bahamas. The Bahamas Development Bank is recapitalized Fund levels were inadequate and by the year 1999, the Bank was experiencing serious liquidity difficulties due to the overwhelming demand for its funds. However, in May 2000, the Bank was able to secure an additional $10 million loan from the Caribbean Development Bank. This amount coupled with a $25 million Government backed bond received from the National Insurance Board in November 2000 substantially improved the Bank’s liquidity position. The Abaco Office is closed to streamline operations. Re-engineering The Bahamas Development Bank Over the years, the Bank has endured challenges that resulted in extraordinary financial hemorrhage and loan portfolio decline culminating in high proportion of non-performing loans. To correct these issues the Bank implemented a strategic plan that significantly boosted performing loans and improved the balance sheet. The New Bahamas Development Bank Recognizing the dynamic global landscape and the evolving role of Development Finance Institutions (DFIs), The Bank refocused to international frameworks for development. The Sustainable Development Goals, Samoa Pathway and Paris Accords are integrated into to the Banks Strategic Plan. The institution expands into targeted sectoral development and new products to better support Bahamian development. In keeping with the updated outlook, the Bank rebrands.

Bank of The Bahamas

boblogo
Biz Phone
242-397-3000
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Nassau
When Bank of The Bahamas received the Euromoney Award for Excellence this year for the fourth time and was named Best Bank in The Country by The Banker, part of the Financial Times Group, for the third time during the same fiscal year, it was an historic milestone in the nation and for the young bank. No other Bahamian bank had ever come close to achieving such international recognition. Yet Managing Director Paul McWeeney hesitated to publicize the two awards, believing the news should be shared with shareholders and stakeholders as opposed to making it a reason for boasting when so many in the nation are still struggling. The Bank, he believes, should continue to do what it has done to grow from infancy 24 years ago to where it is now, rather than basking in recognition.